Difference between revisions of "David Brin/Models, Maps and Visions of Tomorrow"

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m (moved 2006-02-18 Models, Maps and Visions of Tomorrow/text to David Brin/Models, Maps and Visions of Tomorrow: (1) by request, and (2) seems like a better way to file "authored" articles of significance)
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[[Category:licensed]][[Category:notGNU]]'''License''': This text has been copied to {{SITENAME}} with the author's permission.
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* '''License''': This text has been copied to {{SITENAME}} with the permission of the author, [[David Brin]] ([http://davidbrin.com official web site])
 
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* '''Indexing''': This article is formally indexed at [[2006-02-18 Models, Maps and Visions of Tomorrow]]
 
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Ever notice how sometimes a vehement argument can rage for hours, only to have the parties find out they were in agreement all along?  Small differences in nomenclature&mdash;in definitions or logic&mdash;can make apparent bitter foes out of folk who might have been natural allies. One reason for this recurring and sometimes tragic irony is the way we take to <i>labels</i>.
 
Ever notice how sometimes a vehement argument can rage for hours, only to have the parties find out they were in agreement all along?  Small differences in nomenclature&mdash;in definitions or logic&mdash;can make apparent bitter foes out of folk who might have been natural allies. One reason for this recurring and sometimes tragic irony is the way we take to <i>labels</i>.
  
If, say, one person claims to be a Democrat, a self-identified Republican is likely to hear that person's statements through a filter of preconceptions&mdash;<i>What are Democrats like?</i>&mdash;or&mdash;<i>How should a good Republican react?</i>  Often, we hear exactly what we expected to hear, whether or not that was what the other person really meant.  Thus we make [[strawmen]] of others, and deny ourselves the wisdom of complexity.
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If, say, one person claims to be a Democrat, a self-identified Republican is likely to hear that person's statements through a filter of preconceptions &ndash; <i>What are Democrats like?</i> &ndash; or &ndash; <i>How should a good Republican react?</i>  Often, we hear exactly what we expected to hear, whether or not that was what the other person really meant.  Thus we make [[strawmen]] of others, and deny ourselves the wisdom of complexity.
  
 
It has been proposed that human beings are unique in being pattern-recognizing animals. I would rephrase this. Humans are creatures who <i>crave</i> patterns. The same drive that lets us see animal shapes in clouds, and discern underlying laws amid the chaos of physics, also enables us to stereotype each other, painting over intricate issues in stark shades of perceived good and evil.
 
It has been proposed that human beings are unique in being pattern-recognizing animals. I would rephrase this. Humans are creatures who <i>crave</i> patterns. The same drive that lets us see animal shapes in clouds, and discern underlying laws amid the chaos of physics, also enables us to stereotype each other, painting over intricate issues in stark shades of perceived good and evil.

Revision as of 20:01, 24 September 2009