2014/02/23/Worse than Wal-Mart

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When I first did research on Walmart's workplace practices in the early 2000s, I came away convinced that Walmart was the most egregiously ruthless corporation in America. However, ten years later, there is a strong challenger for this dubious distinction – Amazon Corporation. Within the corporate world, Amazon now ranks with Apple as among the United States' most esteemed businesses. Jeff Bezos, Amazon's founder and CEO, came in second in the Harvard Business Review's 2012 world rankings of admired CEOs, and Amazon was third in CNN's 2012 list of the world's most admired companies. Amazon is now a leading global seller not only of books but also of music and movie DVDs, video games, gift cards, cell phones, and magazine subscriptions. Like Walmart itself, Amazon combines state-of-the-art CBSs with human resource practices reminiscent of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Amazon equals Walmart in the use of monitoring technologies to track the minute-by-minute movements and performance of employees and in settings that go beyond the assembly line to include their movement between loading and unloading docks, between packing and unpacking stations, and to and from the miles of shelving at what Amazon calls its "fulfillment centers" – gigantic warehouses where goods ordered by Amazon's online customers are sent by manufacturers and wholesalers, there to be shelved, packaged, and sent out again to the Amazon customer.

Amazon's shop-floor processes are an extreme variant of Taylorism that Frederick Winslow Taylor himself, a near century after his death, would have no trouble recognizing. With this twenty-first-century Taylorism, management experts, scientific managers, take the basic workplace tasks at Amazon, such as the movement, shelving, and packaging of goods, and break down these tasks into their subtasks, usually measured in seconds; then rely on time and motion studies to find the fastest way to perform each subtask; and then reassemble the subtasks and make this "one best way" the process that employees must follow.


You might find your Prime membership morally indefensible after reading these stories about worker mistreatment. +
Worse than Wal-Mart: Amazon's sick brutality and secret history of ruthlessly intimidating workers +
Worse than Wal-Mart +
February 23, 2014 +